Posts Tagged ‘Couple Life’

Couple Builds Own Tiny House on Wheels in 4 Months for $22,744.06 | Full Tour | Could You Live Tiny?

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

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This is the 3rd option of what I like.  I’m impressed with the large kitchen.  It’s better to keep looking and find the type that I like.  This one has stairs.  Watch the video.  It’s pretty clever in the design.  While you watch it… what do you think?  They have a great blog with the link below.

http://tinyhousebuild.com/ presents the “hOMe” tour. Our 221 SF (+128SF in lofts) was self designed and built tiny house on a 28′ trailer. Built for $22k ($33k including all cabinets and appliances), our tiny house feels spacious, roomy and totally livable. BEST house we’ve ever lived in! 🙂 During this video we take you through the entire tiny house, showing each nook and cranny and design features that are working so well. Unlike most cottagey tiny houses, hOMe has a clean, modern feel.

Video | Tiny House | Inside The ProtoHaus + Mobile Office Build

Friday, March 7th, 2014

I think I want to “paint out” my Tiny House to an “off-white” colour from finding a picture on Tumblr of a Tiny House that was painted out. I’ve discovered the two people who live in that house in the States and have some other pictures to share of inside their home.

Even though my Tiny House will be about 578 sq feet… this little one is about 125 sq ft on the main floor (not including the loft).

Ann Holley wanted to create an off-grid, transportable tiny house that would be technically an RV, but with an aesthetic that wouldn’t feel like living in an RV. What she created with her partner Darren Macca is a 125-square-foot “stick built” home with a cedar exterior and a refreshing and expanding all-white interior.

The ProtoHaus has proven to be a truly portable home, making several cross country journeys. The couple originally built the home during a summer on her parents’ property in Colorado. They then drove it 1,500 miles to Alfred, New York where they lived in it for a year while Holley was in grad school. Then they drove it back to Colorado where they parked it on a traditional lot in Longmont, Colorado.

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Could you live in a Tiny House? Could you try and live with less and try and have a bigger life?

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Below is a little video taken before all of the finishing touches were added. The cost for this house was $25,000

Video below of inside the ProtoHaus. I find it neat to watch the videos to get a better understanding of what it will be like living in one.  I’m going to use Goodlife Fitness for the “Three S’s”… but there are so many options to consider.

 

For their next project they wanted to create a tiny “flexible space”, something that could function as a guest house or a mobile office. The ProtoStoga just 40 square feet and it’s design is “a hybrid between a Gypsy Vardo, Airstream-esque Trailer, Conestoga Wagon and a Shepherd Hut”. At under 1,500 pounds (the Protohaus is 9,500), Macca can tow it with his 4 cylinder car and often uses it to cut his commute. He leaves it in a park across from his work and instead of commuting home, he camps out in it.

ProtoHaus: http://www.protohaus.moonfruit.com/

The Tiny Tack House | Tiny Living Inspiration | Could You Live Simple To Have More Life?

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Came across a blog that my buddy Drew shared with me. Just wanted to share a blog post that they shared that provides a great look inside where they live. Check them out: http://chrisandmalissa.com/

It’s interesting to look inside them from pictures on blog posts to try and get an idea of what it might be like to live inside one. Here is some images and text from them below…__________________________

Here are the newest photos of The Tiny Tack House. You will find both some interior and exterior shots that include new construction. You will notice a second workstation was added opposite the wall mounted iMac. Malissa built a beautiful table out of some old pallets. Now it serves as our outside dining room 🙂 We also added a hummingbird and bird feeder. We have many regular visitors including: American Goldfinch, Chickadee, Quail (who is very vain…he admires his reflection in the grill & lantern), Anna’s Hummingbird, Steller’s Jay, Black-capped Chickadee, House Finch & more!

We have been working on a garden near the house as well (photos to come).

Hope you enjoy the new photos!

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Thinking Tiny | Living Without Sacrifice: Solutions to the Top 5 Tiny House Limitations

Monday, February 24th, 2014

Just wanted to pin this here. So many great Tiny House Blogs for inspiration and reference. Cheers! Dan

by Gabriella Morrison (from Tiny House Blog)

Do you want to live tiny but are worried about having to make too many sacrifices in space and comfort? We were too but can say with total confidence and from experience that with the right design and house size choice, you can go tiny and still live extremely comfortably. We will assume DSC_0131that if you are reading this article on TinyHouseBlog.com that you share some (if not all) of the same dreams, goals, and values that we do. Living a life that is mortgage/rent inexpensive or free, that is abundant in time for travel, hobbies, family and friends, that is peaceful and harmonious is what we have been working towards for decades. We were so committed to creating that lifestyle for ourselves that we took a risk and built a tiny house (221 SF on a 28′ trailer + 128 SF in lofts) rather than a more conventionally sized home. We were prepared (and willing!) to make significant sacrifices in square footage to achieve our life goals.

DSC_0159Here’s the kicker: to our surprise we have not felt, at any point, that we have had to make any compromises or sacrifices in our self designed and built home. Not once have we felt that our space was too small, that our needs weren’t luxuriously met, or that we didn’t have enough space to run our home business, entertain, cook, bathe, watch movies, play guitar, wrestle with our dog, or store our clothes and belongings. Not once have we been uncomfortable, hurt our backs in the lofts, struggled on our stairs, felt like our fridge or kitchen sink was too small, or felt that we didn’t have enough space for an item.

Here are the common areas in a conventional tiny house that typically pose significant compromises/sacrifice and how we found a solution for each:

Tiny StairsSTAIRS: I would venture to guess that this is one of the top 3 reasons that someone would not build tiny. We’re youngish, strong and healthy but we don’t want to haul our bodies up and down dinky ladders to get to our bedroom each day. And what if we have to get up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom? Not only do ladders to bedrooms sound miserable but they also seem like a bad idea for someone like me who fumbles to the bathroom with eyes nearly shut at night. We designed our house, which we loving named “hOMe,” specifically to accommodate Andrew’s modular stair system. The ratio between the treads and risers is set up so that going up is as easy and comfortable as coming down (even with my middle of the night fumbling). Further, there is 25 SF of storage space beneath the stairs and even enough space for a washer/dryer combo unit. Personally, we are using that large washer space as our hanging closet as it can easily hang 20 items of clothing. We also store all of our shoes, hats, winter apparel, dog accoutrements, keys, and purse in the modular system. It is a treasure trove of storage.

Tiny Kitchen 1KITCHEN: We are all for rustic living and have certainly done our share over the years including living in an 80 SF historic, off grid log cabin in the Colorado Rockies, tons of long term back country camping and spending 5 months traveling in a pop-up tent trailer in Baja with our 12 year old daughter. We know we CAN cook in a tiny kitchen with two burners, wash dishes in a tiny sink, and cram all of our food into a dorm sized fridge, but we don’t WANT to. Not in our home that we plan on spending many, many years in. In order for a space to feel like a home to us, there has to be a spacious kitchen. Ours is 56 SF and it is perfect. Andrew and I can easily cook together without bumping into each other. Our propane range/oven is a standard, full size unit which has 5 burners including the center griddle component. Our fridge is a super energy efficient, 18 CF model which we have yet to really fill up, and our sink is a standard, deep, single bowl with a built-in drying rack.

Tiny Kitchen 2We have lots of cabinets and storage galore: frankly, too much of it. More than half of our cabinets and drawers are empty because we have gotten really clear on what is necessary in our kitchen and eliminated unnecessary gadgets. I wouldn’t trade in that extra cabinet storage because we love how much counter space it provides. It also makes for excellent overflow storage should we need some extra space for a special occasion. Further, creating a U shaped kitchen was one of the best decisions we made in our house design as the work triangle is just the right size.

Tiny Bathroom SinkBATHROOM: Again, I know that we CAN brush our teeth in a mini-sink and shower in an 18″ x 18″ stall, but in our home, we really don’t want to. During our build we made a significant and vital design change that increased our bathroom length by 2′. This extra space allowed us to install a regular sized sinkand shower unit. Now the bathroom feels spacious, even with our giant Sun-Mar composting toilet. I mean, that thing is obscenely large and easily twice the size of a regular toilet.

Tiny bathroomWe have an abundance of storage space in two full drawers under our sink as well as a floor to ceiling storage cabinet. All of our toiletries, first aid supplies, vitamins and supplements (yes, we are those types that take about 20 natural supplements per day, so room for all that is no small thing), soaps/shampoos, cleaning and laundry supplies only use up about half of our available storage space. I should mention as a side note (read EXTRA benefit) that both the kitchen and bathroom, which are located beneath the lofts, have ample head room and do not feel cramped at all. That’s easy for me to say, but Andrew feels the same way and he is 6′ tall. Furthermore, our bedroom loft and our secondary loft both have great headroom as well.

Tiny House OfficeHOME OFFICE: I have worked from home full-time since 2004 and Andrew since 2007. We are both self motivated, passionate about what we do, and wouldn’t trade our jobs for anything. We have tried working outside of our home but have found that we are most productive and love our jobs best when we are working from within our own walls. No commute, we create our own hours, and pay no rent for an office space. Creating a functional office area in hOMe was a necessity and we feel we accomplished that. By creating a Tiny House Office 2paperless office (you can watch a short video on how we did that here), we eliminated 75% of the space we used to require to run our business. We found two folding desks that do double duty between office/work desk and eating table. Our printer and scanner are stored in our cabinets and all of our office supplies fit in just one tall cabinet unit. We also have overflow work space in three other areas in hOMe: our bedroom loft (we bought two bed loungers so that we can comfortably sit up in our bed), our TV/hang out lounge (lots of pillows create a wonderful cradle to prop us up) and the built in sofa. So if one of us is working on something that requires a lot of concentration without disruption, there are choices of work spaces.

Tiny House StorageSTORAGE: The hOMe design centers around a long and tall series of cabinets from Ikea. Even though we have freed ourselves from about 90% of our belongings over our last 3 year downsizing process (you can read more about that here), we still own some material objects. Again, we know that we can live with nothing more than 4 changes of clothes, a couple books, a laptop, toothbrush/floss, and a set of very basic cooking essentials, but in our own home, we need space to store some of the items and heirlooms that we don’t want to part with. Our cabinets provide us with 82 SF of storage shelving surface area, more than enough for our belongings and to house our favorite books, camping supplies, linens, etc.

Tiny Privacy WallPRIVACY: Andrew and I are super compatible. We have been partners in life since 1993, still love each other’s company, and are glad that we don’t work separate jobs in different places only to see each other for a few hours in the evening. That said, I don’t want to hear or see him every single Tiny House Privacysecond of my day (and I’m sure he feels the same about me!). So, we have been happily surprised and delighted at how much privacy we can find in hOMe. Because our bedroom loft is pretty large and has a wall that separates it from the open area below, it really feels like a separate bedroom. When one of us is up here, it feels like we are in totally different rooms. Perfect!

In sum, we have been ecstatic with hOMe and living tiny. Truly it is beyond expectation and our wildest dreams. The months of planning and design paid off and at this point there isn’t a thing we would change. By identifying and addressing each of the common tiny house limitations that we weren’t personally willing to live with, we were able to find solutions that are working. Because we chose to build tiny rather than a larger house, we were able to pay for the materials in cash and now have the security of knowing that we will always have a place on this planet that we can live for free. And being that it’s off grid, we aren’t bound to utility bills and the system. If you are considering making the move to tiny, we highly recommend it. If we can do it, so can you!

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Own Less, Live More: 700 Sq. Ft. Small House of Freedom | Tiny Living

Saturday, February 1st, 2014

KLand sent me this article. Just wanted to share. The link to the full article is at the bottom.

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When it comes to small houses planning and design really counts.

This couple began creating ideas for their future “perfect” home early in their marriage.

They wanted a home that was big enough for just the two of them (and their dogs).

This way they’d have more time and money for their personal interests.

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See more of Lily Copenagle and Jamie Kennel’s small house below. They’re the couple behind this 700 sq. ft. house of freedom.

 

And the home is environmentally friendly, too. They use a rainwater system to reuse water and hydrate their plants. They also have a 550-gallon rain barrel on the property.

Cleaning is a breeze since you can plug the vacuum in at one spot and reach the entire house from there.

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It’s a one room design with a curtain for privacy to enclose the bedroom when desired. The home was completed in 2012 with costs of about $135,000 to build (including labor and materials).

A Rais wood stove that swivels is what keeps the place warm.

They were also able to include an office area for the both of them.

Along with book shelves throughout to store their collection of literature.

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Another one of their smart design moves was putting the washer and dryer in their clothes closet so that doing laundry is quick, easy and painless.

Genius, I say.

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If you head out back on the property you’ll also notice two storage sheds with living roofs.

One of the sheds is like a workshop with tools, bench and garden supplies while the other holds their recreational stuff like their kayak and other outdoor gear.

And yes, they actually have the spare time to use this stuff thanks to their less demanding home.

“There’s so much personal freedom in going smaller,” says Mr. Kennel in the article at the NY Times.

Read the original article here.

See more by taking a complete photo tour of their 700 sq. ft. home here (click on View Slide Show when you get there).

 

How To | Campfire Dinner | Date-Day

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Photographs by: Mikaela Hamilton

This feature focuses on a recipe many people call ‘the hobo meal’

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things you’ll need:

-firewood

-peppers, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, smoked sausage (and really any other vegetable you’d like)

-aluminum foil

-olive oil, salt, pepper, crushed red pepper, garlic

-knives + forks

01-'how-to' moakler-20 13-5instructions:

first, get a great fire going- the more coals the better.

then chop all of the vegetables + sausage & place on aluminum foil.  drizzle with oil + seasonings to taste.

bunch aluminum foil up into a big ball (I typically wrap an extra layer around the aluminum so nothing leaks out)

lay in the fire & let cook for around 15 minutes, depending on how hot your fire is (often I’ll rotate it halfway through to make sure everything is cooking fairly evenly)

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while you’re waiting for that to cook, keep warm with some coffee + bourbon cream.

14-411-'how-to' moakler-15806-'how-to' moakler-96after 15 minutes or so, take it out of the fire, add a few more seasonings, & eat your heart out.

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dessert:

s’mores, duh.  but why not get a little crazy & add a Reese’s?

things you’ll need:

– graham crackers, chocolate, Reese’s, marshmellows

– skewers

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I think it’s important to get outside with someone that you care about and explore.  Simple things.  A hike or a walk in a forest and why not pack a little lunch.  In this example… just packing some things in a car and visit a Provincial Park and day-camp and hang out for the day would be nice.  It’s easy to pack a cooler with some goodies to cook up.  Bring some cooked chicken in marinade and throw that in a another pouch.