Archive for the ‘Movies’ Category

In Progress – List3 | 1 of 101 | Knock My Movie List Down to 300 Titles | Flicks w/ Chips + Dips

Monday, March 20th, 2017

As of August 20th, 2016 my watch list is 444 movies. 

As of March 22th, 2017 my watch list is 418 movies.

This is the first task in my 101 Things To Do In A 1001 Days which I have over two years left to complete to get my list down to 300 titles.  I will do this one.  My goal is a movie every 2-3 days.  My list grows as I add titles and sometimes I take a couple away if I’ve gone completely cold on a title and would never click to watch it online.

Just wanted to have a spot where I could list some of the movies that I want to see. I like to ask people for some recommendations and I stick them in Evernote to keep track of. I will have to set it up better and bring some to the top and focus on those first. I’m sure there is 400 movies not listed. Life is long… I’ll try to list a sentence or two after I see them…

Here is a list that will grow of some of the movies that I want to watch.

To see my FULL WATCHLIST on IDMb, you can visit it here.

The movies I have watched since being separated are listed below in this blog post…

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Banff Mountain Film Festival | World Tour

Monday, January 16th, 2017

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In December my buddy Drew mentioned that there is this little film festival that comes to town.  He asked me if I wanted a ticket and I emailed him the money for mine.  This year this festival makes it’s third appearance here in Peterborough and it sold out right away.  This year they stretched it to 3 days.  This festival makes it’s way around the world to 40 countries and about 500,000 people view it.  There are about 35 films shown in the 1,000 screenings around the world.  In Banff there is about 20,000 people who view the festival.  Each day of the festival here in PTBO they show different films.  Next year… I’m going to get tickets to two sessions.

You can catch the Toronto shows in March at the Bloor Cinema and you can get the info right here.

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The films they presented during my viewing were:

Sea Gypsies: The Far Side of the World (Tour Edit)

46 Mins
The vessel is Infinity, a 120-ft hand-built sailing ketch, crewed by a community of wanderers. The journey – a 12,800-kilometre Pacific crossing from New Zealand to Patagonia, with a stop in Antarctica, weather permitting.  This film epitomizes the spirit of adventure.  I really enjoyed this one.

Sea Gypsies: The Far Side of the World – Trailer from Nico on Vimeo.

The Accord

19 Mins
Being so far removed from the hustle and bustle of the tropical surf world hardens Iceland’s surfers to confront the harsh reality they all must face – that old and unforgiving North Atlantic wind.

Danny MacAskill’s Wee Day Out

6 Mins
Want to see what Danny MacAskill does on his day off? Explore the rural landscape around Edinburgh in a film that sets out to capture the simple fun of a ride in the country with moments of incredible riding and a touch of humour.

Dog Power (Tour Edit)

25 Mins
Get a fascinating view of the world of dog-powered sports and the special bond between dogs and their humans. Both share a passion for living, working and playing together outside in different forms of the sled-dog and musher relationship.

Doing it Scared

12 Mins
Eighteen years after a catastrophic accident which left him partially paralyzed, climber Paul Pritchard returns to the Totem Pole to find out if he has recovered enough to finish the climb.  Another filmmaker interviewed him and you can watch it on Youtube here.  He also has a little Everest film and you can watch it on Youtube here.

Doing it Scared Trailer from Rummin Productions on Vimeo.

Max Your Days

5 Mins
Summer solstice on Canada’s West Coast – the possibilities are endless!

Packing It Out: Cleaning America’s Wild Trails

4 Mins
Follow the guys from the “Packing It Out” crew as they pick up litter – and inspire everyone they meet – along the Pacific Coast Trail.  You can watch this one here on vimeo.

The Perfect Flight

5 Mins
When some neighborhood kids gave Shawn Hayes an abandoned red-tailed chick, it launched him on a lifelong journey into the medieval traditions of falconry.

Be A Man | A Real Man | FRED et marie | Part One + Two

Monday, October 5th, 2015

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FRED et marie (English subtitles) from fredetmarie on Vimeo.

 

Two great shorts on the blog today.  A great message for Women & Men… as well as young teens that will grow up and hopefully mature into good people. Have respect for people especially the ones that you love & cherish.

Part Two is below…

Marie et Fred (English subtitles) from fredetmarie on Vimeo.

Movie | Living On One Dollar | College Students Learn What It Takes To Live On $1 A Day

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

 

1-April 2014 Tumblr4I had the opportunity to watch a great documentary called “Living On One Dollar” which is a 7.2 on IMDb.  I rated it an 8 and loved it.  It mad.e me think about my situation as well as the benefits of KIVA.  I would recommend to anyone to watch it.  You can stream it here on Watch32.com (just close the pop-up’s)

Below is a little article about the project:

 

An estimated 1.1 billion people in the world survive on just $1 a day.

 

It’s a figure Claremont McKenna College economics students Chris Temple and Zach Ingrasci couldn’t get out of their heads.

 

“What can I do? That’s the hardest part about it … there is no one answer,” says Temple. “[The U.S.] has poured $2.5 trillion dollars into international development trying to end poverty and a lot of times it just made things worse.”

 

Together, the pair decided to take their studies outside the classroom, to someplace more practical –– the edge of poverty itself.

 

Living on $1 a day for two months, they moved to a remote Guatemalan town to study the people’s relationship with money and see firsthand how access to small lines of credit could impact their livelihoods.

 

They documented their journey in a new film called “Living On One.”

 

“For all our academic learning, there were some things a textbook just couldn’t answer,” Temple says.

 

The pair made their way by plane and multiple bumpy bus rides to the village of Peña Blanca (White Pain), along with two videographers. There was nothing luxurious about their living arrangement.

 

On a budget of $224 for 56 days ($1 per person), they squeezed into a tiny shack on the outskirts of town, with cardboard boxes and a few blankets separating them from the dirt floor.

 

To make their experiment realistic, they split the $224 into random denominations between 0 and 9. Each morning, they drew a slip of paper out of a hat with how much money they’d “earn” that day.

 

Their logic was simple: Most people in the town were day laborers and never knew how much they’d earn on a typical day. To see firsthand the benefits of micro-lending, they, like many others in the village, took out a small loan to start a side business to supplement their income.  They settled on a radish farm.

 

In the ensuing weeks, they dealt with exhaustion, food deprivation, E. Coli, parasites, and a bed bug infestation. Temple dropped 20 pounds by day 56.

 

“That was the point where I was like, I want to go home,” says Ingrasci, who had fainting spells from fatigue. “I need to get out of here. Why am I doing this? And we were eating better than a lot of people in the community.”

 

It was Temple who fell ill with E. Coli, and the $25 medicine needed to treat his symptoms would have bankrupted the group. It occurred to them that like low-income consumers in the U.S., people in the village lacked quick access to emergency funds.  Banks often required a host of financial documentation like bills and proof of employment they often couldn’t produce.

 

Instead, they relied on loans from neighbors, or banks specializing in small loans like Grameen.

 

“It was so huge to see the potential for what even the simple access to credit could do,” Temple says.

 

If the name Grameen sounds familiar, it’s likely because it was the brain child of economist Muhammad Yunus that earned him the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize.

 

The Bangladeshi economist pioneered the micro-lending movement and has been widely known as the “banker of the poor.”

 

For all Yunus’ positive press, critics claim the micro-lending movement is simply a band-aid on the larger issue of widespread poverty.  Once microfinance made waves, large banks began targeting low-income customers in developing nations as a new source of revenue, sparking Business Week to run a piece on the “Ugly Side of Micro-Lending.”

 

But by Ingrasci and Temple’s account, small loans were already changing the fates of Peña Blanca residents, often meaning the difference between getting an education or dropping out for a paycheck.

 

“That’s what we’re trying to prove,” Temple says. “So much here is the power of partial solutions.”

Falling Slowly – Glen Hansard + Marketa Irglova | Movie “Once” (2006)

Monday, March 17th, 2014

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Have not watched this movie yet.  I did fall in love with the trailer to the movie.  I have it downloaded on my laptop.  I just love her voice.  Accent.  Scarf.  Sweaters.  Simple women are sexy.

Below is a scene from the movie…

Can’t wait to watch this one.  Also it is a really great story of how they fell in love in real life.

Finding Vivian Maier | Trailer | Her Work Is Incredible

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

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Incredible.  I want to see this doc.