The Vietnam Notebook | 2012 | Film By Casey Neistat

November 28th, 2016

 

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A couple of weeks ago… Casey wanted to finish putting together a little movie about a trip he took with his son in 2012.  Love the journal he kept as they travelled documenting things with photos, video and paper with a mini-scrapbook.

Exploring.

Documenting with life and with kids.

As you might have heard… Casey is stopping his daily vlog a short time ago. He just sold his app Beme to CNN for 25 mil and will be starting up a separate media company for CNN next year announced today.  I’ve enjoyed just how creative his is with his eye for the angles and edits.  I’m looking forward to the little videos he produces.

You can view all my casey posts here.

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NPR Tiny Desk Concert | The National

November 23rd, 2016

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The National with a little NPR Tiny Desk concert.  They are a little indie band from Ohio and they are perfect for just letting them play in the earbuds as you muster around in life.  Second song from this little four song set is sweet.  Love.

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Wired Writer Evan Ratliff Tried to Vanish: Here’s What Happened

November 22nd, 2016

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This story is about a 40min read.  I would highly recommend reading it here with photos and video.  This story is one that I’m always sharing and wondering how impossible it would be to fall off the grid. 

August 13, 6:40 PM: I’m driving East out of San Francisco on I-80, fleeing my life under the cover of dusk. Having come to the interstate by a circuitous route, full of quick turns and double backs, I’m reasonably sure that no one is following me. I keep checking the rearview mirror anyway. From this point on, there’s no such thing as sure. Being too sure will get me caught.

 

I had intended to flee in broad daylight, but when you are going on the lam, there are a surprising number of last-minute errands to run. This morning, I picked up a set of professionally designed business cards for my fake company under my fake name, James Donald Gatz. I drove to a Best Buy, where I bought two prepaid cell phones with cash and then put a USB cord on my credit card — an arbitrary dollar amount I hoped would confuse investigators, who would scan my bill and wonder what gadgetry I had purchased. An oil change for my car was another head fake. Who would think that a guy about to sell his car would spend $60 at Oil Can Henry’s?

I already owned a couple of prepaid phones; I left one of the new ones with my girlfriend and mailed the other to my parents — giving them an untraceable way to contact me in emergencies. I bought some Just for Men beard-and-mustache dye at a drugstore. My final stop was the bank, to draw a $477 cashier’s check. It’s payment for rent on an anonymous office in Las Vegas, which is where I need to deliver the check by midday tomorrow.

Crossing the Bay Bridge, I glance back for a last nostalgic glimpse of the skyline. Then I reach over, slide the back cover off my cell phone, and pop out the battery. A cell phone with a battery inside is a cell phone that’s trackable.

About 25 minutes later, as the California Department of Transportation database will record, my green 1999 Honda Civic, California plates 4MUN509, passes through the tollbooth on the far side of the Carquinez Bridge, setting off the FasTrak toll device, and continues east toward Lake Tahoe.

What the digital trail will not reflect is that a few miles past the bridge I pull off the road, detach the FasTrak, and stuff it into the duffle bag in my trunk, where its signal can’t be detected. Nor will it note that I then double back on rural roads to I-5 and drive south through the night, cutting east at Bakersfield. There will be no digital record that at 4 am I hit Primm, Nevada, a sad little gambling town about 40 minutes from Vegas, where $15 cash gets me a room with a view of a gravel pile.

“Author Evan Ratliff Is on the Lam. Locate Him and Win $5,000.”
— wired.com/vanish, August 14, 2009 5:38 pm

Officially it will be another 24 hours before the manhunt begins. That’s when Wired‘s announcement of my disappearance will be posted online. It coincides with the arrival on newsstands of the September issue of the magazine, which contains a page of mugshot-like photos of me, eyes slightly vacant. The premise is simple: I will try to vanish for a month and start over under a new identity.Wired readers, or whoever else happens upon the chase, will try to find me.

The idea for the contest started with a series of questions, foremost among them: How hard is it to vanish in the digital age? Long fascinated by stories of faked deaths, sudden disappearances, and cat-and-mouse games between investigators and fugitives, I signed on to write a story forWired about people who’ve tried to end one life and start another. People fret about privacy, but what are the consequences of giving it all up, I wondered. What can investigators glean from all the digital fingerprints we leave behind? You can be anybody you want online, sure, but can you reinvent yourself in real life?

It’s one thing to report on the phenomenon of people disappearing. But to really understand it, I figured that I had to try it myself. So I decided to vanish. I would leave behind my loved ones, my home, and my name. I wasn’t going off the grid, dropping out to live in a cabin. Rather, I would actually try to drop my life and pick up another.

Wired offered a $5,000 bounty — $3,000 of which would come out of my own pocket — to anyone who could locate me between August 15 and September 15, say the password “fluke,” and take my picture. Nicholas Thompson, my editor, would have complete access to information that a private investigator hired to find me might uncover: my real bank accounts, credit cards, phone records, social networking accounts, and email. I’d give Thompson my friends’ contact information so he could conduct interviews. He would parcel out my personal details online, available to whichever amateur or professional investigators chose to hunt for me. To add a layer of intrigue, Wired hired the puzzle creators at Lone Shark Games to help structure the contest.

 

Click below to open the full cut and paste 😉

 

Read the rest of this entry »

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Ben Brown | Visual Vibes

October 27th, 2016

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Mr. Ben Brown and Nicole are two vloggers that are pretty wild to follow.  Ben does these little visual vibes when he takes the footage and drops it into one video.  You can subscribe to him on YouTube.  I wanted to share his Arctic Visual Vibes below.  Love how it’s captured.

 

 

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It’s Not The Things | It’s The Memories

October 23rd, 2016

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Yesterday’s Vlog by Casey was cool since he went back to tell a little story of when he climbed Mount Kilimanjaro

It’s always nice when he goes back to pull old footage and tell a story.  Near the end he talks about what his Mother told him… and I agree with him and not her.

This video reminds me of another story that is below when him and his buddy Graham climbed another mountain.  I love his story telling.

Jesus.  I need to climb a hill.  Just a hill.  Have to start somewhere.

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Will You Have a Sunday Night Ben Howard Concert With Me

October 23rd, 2016

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Sunday night and I’m going to have a concert on the blog with my boy Ben Howard.  It’s a little concert with a couple of YouTube vids to play in a row.  I might type a little under each one.

Just a little concert on a cooler October night.  Might as well get in bed with his one.  This is more of “old Ben” with songs from is first album released main stream.

It’s a earbud concert with an iPad or even a laptop to watch.   It’s about 25 minutes long.  I would honestly bring up the sound as loud as you can get it.

First song above is “Old Pine” which is a nice song to start off.  It opens the “Every Kingdom” CD.

It’s a little 6:53 song.  It’s also a nice slow peaceful song till the 4:46 mark and it will start to build till the 5:45 mark and this always brings a smile to my face.

You will notice the lovely Lady India Bourne on the magnificent cello and Chris Bond back on the drums and also playing base.

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Next is Gracious and it’s a little 5:34 song in length.  This is a little quiet song that makes the mind peaceful.

Now we are a little over the 10 min mark in the set of our little Sunday night concert.

Next up is Black Flies below…

This song will get us to the 19 minute mark.  You think the song is going to wrap up around the 5 min mark.  Nope.  It’s building again.  I remember before going to his concert… I ripped a full concert from YouTube and imported it into my iTunes and then I would listen to and from work on my iPod.   A sweet build to the end of the week with the concert.

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The last song : The Fear

This was my song of the year for 2012 and I’m in love always with the live version played at concerts where he looses his shit at the end on the guitar.  I love India standing to the left on the drums.

3:50 in… the build will start.

4:45… the words is the reason why I love this song.

5:10 India

5:20 India Swoon

6:15 More India love

6:36 song over…

Nope.  Ben is going to loose his shit.

This song was wild at Echo Beach in 2013 in Toronto.  Wild.  It was also wild at the Mod Club in Toronto in the fall of 2012.

Concert is over at the 26 min mark.  

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What… ???  You Clapping for more???

Ok one more.  You need to like “Promise” and feel it out for the quiet beauty it is.

The encore to soften it up.  Just a sweet sweet song to get to bed to.  It’s 6 min of mellowing haunting guitar and soft vocals.

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